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New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards

For Social Studies

Civics - Section 6.2

World History - Section 6.3

United States / New Jersey History - Section 6.4


Activities related to Thomas Paine: An American Patriot and reading the newspaper, may achieve the following New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Civics:

Through the 4th Grade

6.2.4 A. Civic Life, Politics, and Government
1. Describe the characteristics of an effective rule or low (e.g., achieves purpose, clear, fair, protects rights and the common good).
2. Differentiate between power and authority.
3. Recognize that government exists at the community, county, state, and federal levels.

6.2.4 B. American Values and Principles
1. Identify the fundamental values and principles of American democracy expressed in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and the first New Jersey Constitution.
3. Describe how American values and beliefs, such as equality of opportunity, fairness to all, equal justice, separation of church and state, and the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights, contribute to the continuation and improvement of American democracy.
4. Evaluate the importance of traditions, values, and beliefs, which form a common American heritage in an increasingly diverse American society.

6.2.4 C. The Constitution and American Democracy
1. Discuss how the Constitution describes how the United States government is organized and how it defines and limits the power of government.
4. Delineate the respective roles of the three branches of the federal and state governments.

6.2.4 D. Citizenship
3. Describe the process by which immigrants can become United States citizens.

6.2.4 E. International Education: Global Challenges, Cultures, and Connections
2. Discuss how the United States interacts with other nations of the world through trade, treaties and agreements, diplomacy, cultural contacts, and sometimes through the use of military force.

Through the 8th Grade

6.2.8 A. Civic Life, Politics, and Government
1. Discuss the sources, purposes, and functions of law and the importance of the rule of law for the preservation of individual rights and the common good.
2. Describe the underlying values and principles of democracy an distinguish these from authoritarian forms of government..

6.2.8 B. American Values and Principles
1. Analyze how certain values including individual rights, the common good, self-government, justice, equality and free inquiry are fundamental to American public life.

6.2.8 C. The Constitution and American Democracy
1. Discuss the major principals of the Constitution, including shared powers, checks and balances, separation of church and state, and federalism.
4. Discuss major historical and contemporary conflicts over United States constitutional principles, including judicial review in Marbury v. Madison, slavery in the Dred Scott Decision, separate but equal in Plessy v. Ferguson, and the rights of minorities in the Indian Removal Act.

6.2.8 D. Citizenship
1. Discuss the rights and responsibilities of American citizens, including obeying laws, paying taxes, serving on juries, and voting in local, state, and national elections.

6.2.8 E. International Education: Global Challenges, Cultures, and Connections
1. Analyze ways in which nation-states interact with one another through trade, diplomacy, cultural exchanges, treaties or agreements, humanitarian aid, economic incentives and sanctions, and the use or threat of military force.
3. Compare and contrast the powers the Constitution gives to Congress, the President, and Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and the federal judiciary regarding foreign affairs.

Through the 12th Grade

6.2.12 A. Civic Life, Politics, and Government
1. Analyze how reserved and jointly held powers in the United States Constitution result in tensions among the three branches of government and how these tensions are resolved (e.g., Marbury v. Madison-1803; Federalist #78; United States v. Nixon-1974, claims of Executive Privilege by Presidents Nixon, Clinton, and Bush).

6.2.12 B. American Values and Principles
1. Analyze major historical events and important ideas that led to and sustained the constitutional government of the United States, including the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the Judiciary Act of 1789, the first Cabinet under George Washington, and Amendments 1-15.
4. Discuss how a common and shared American civic culture is based on commitment to central ideas in founding-era documents (e.g., United States Constitution) and in core documents of subsequent periods of United States history (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address; Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions-1848; The Gettysburg Address; President Franklin Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms’’ speech-1941; President Kennedy’s Inaugural Address-1961; the 17th, 19th, and 24th Amendments; Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream’’ speech and the “Letter from Birmingham Jail’’).

6.2.12 C. The Constitution and American Democracy
1. Debate current issues and controversies involving the central ideas of the American constitutional system, including representative government (e.g., Electoral College and the popular vote), civic virtue (e.g., increasing voter turnout through registrations and campaigns), checks and balances, and limits on governmental power.
2. Analyze, through current and historical examples and Supreme Court Cases, the scope of governmental power and how the constitutional distribution of responsibilities seeks to prevent the abuse of that power.
3. Compare the American system of representative government with systems in other democracies such as the parliamentary systems in England and France.
4. Compare and contrast the major constitutional and legal responsibilities of the federal government for domestic and foreign policy and describe how disagreements are resolved.
5. Describe the nature of political parties in America and how they reflect the spectrum of political views on current state and federal policy issues.
6. Explain the federal and state legislative process and analyze the influence of lobbying, advocacy groups, the media, and campaign finance on the development of laws and regulations.

6.2.12 E. International Education: Global Challenges, Cultures, and Connections
1. Compare and contrast key past and present United States foreign policy actions (e.g., diplomacy, economic aid, humanitarian aid, military aid) and positions (e.g., treaties, sanctions, interventions) and evaluate their consequences.
2. Analyze and evaluate United States foreign policy actions and positions, including the Monroe Doctrine, the Mexican Cession, the Truman Doctrine, the Cold War, the world-wide struggle against terrorism, and the Iraq War.


Activities related to Thomas Paine: An American Patriot and reading the newspaper, may achieve the following New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for World History:

6.3.12 D. The Age of Global Encounters (1400-1750)
6. Discuss the major developments in European society and culture, including:
. The English Revolution and the strengthening of Parliament as a countervailing force to the monarchy and importance of the balance of powers, including the Glorious Revolution and the English Bill of Rights;

6.3.12 E. The Age of Revolutionary Change (1750-1914)
1. Discuss the causes and consequences of political revolutions in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, including:
. The ideas and events that shaped the French Revolution (e.g., monarchy v.s. social ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity; political beliefs and writings; development of the empire).


Activities related to Thomas Paine: An American Patriot and reading the newspaper, may achieve the following New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for United States / New Jersey History:

Through the 8th Grade

6.4.8 D. Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
1. Analyze the political, social, and cultural characteristics of the English colonies.
2. Describe the political, religious, social, and economic institutions that emerged in Colonial America, including New Netherland and colonial New Jersey.
3. Explain the differences in colonization of the Americas by England, the Netherlands, France, and Spain, including governance, relation to the mother countries, and interactions with other colonies and Native Americans.

6.4.8 E. Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
1. Discuss the background and major issues of the American Revolution, including the political and economic causes and consequences of the revolution.
3. Identify major British and American leaders and describe their roles in key events, such as the First and Second Continental Congresses, drafting and approving the Declaration of Independence (1776), the publication of “Common Sense,’’ and major battles of the Revolutionary War.
4. Explain New Jersey’s critical role in the American Revolution, including major battles, the involvement of women and African Americans, and the origins of the movement to abolish slavery.
5. Discuss the political and philosophical origins of the United States Constitution and its implementation in the 1790s.

Through the 12th Grade

6.4.12 D. Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
1. Analyze the major issues of the colonial period, including European hegemony over North America and mercantilism and trade.
2. Analyze how American colonial experiences caused change in the economic institutions of Europe, Africa, and the native population by examining indentured servitude and slavery and the rights of men and women.

6.4.12 E. Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
1. Discuss the social, political, and religious aspects of the American Revolution, including key decisions leading the Revolution, efforts by Parliament and the colonies to prevent revolution, the ideas of different religious denominations, and the economic and social differences of Loyalists, Patriots, and those who remained neutral.
2. Analyze the social and economic impact of the Revolutionary War, including problems of financing the war (e.g., wartime inflation, hoarding and profiteering), the impact of the war on women and African Americans, and the personal and economic hardships on families involved with the war.
3. Discuss the involvement of European nations during the Revolution and how their involvement influenced the outcome and aftermath (e.g., the assistance of France and Spain, how the self-interests of France and Spain differed from the United States after the war, the contributions of European military leaders, the creation of the Alien Sedition Acts).
4. Analyze strategic elements used during the Revolutionary War, discuss turning points during the war, and explain how the Americas won the war against superior resources.
5. Analyze New Jersey’s role in the American Revolution, including New Jersey’s Constitution of 1776 as a revolutionary document, why some New Jerseyans became Loyalists, and the Battles of Trenton, Princeton, and Monmouth.
6. Compare and contrast the major philosophical and historical influences on the development of the Constitution (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address (1796), Locke’s Second Treatise, the ideas of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and William Paterson).


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